Book , Print in English

Argonauts of the western Pacific : an account of native enterprise and adventure in the archipelagoes of Melanesian New Guinea

by Bronislaw Malinowski.
  • Long Grove, Illinois : Waveland Press, Inc., 2013.
  • Enhanced edition.
  • xxix, 527 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
Subjects
Contents
  • note: I. Sailing, and trading in the South Seas; the Kula
  • II. Method in Ethnography
  • III. Starting field work
  • Some perplexing difficulties
  • Three conditions of success
  • IV. Life in a tent among the natives. Mechanism of "getting in touch" with them
  • V. Active methods of research
  • Order and consistency in savage cultures
  • Methodological consequences of this truth
  • VI. Formulating the principles of tribal constitution and of the anatomy of culture
  • Method of inference from statistic accumulation of concrete data
  • Uses of synoptic charts
  • VII. Presentation of the intimate touches of native life; of types of behaviour
  • Method of systematic fixing of impressions; of detailed, consecutive records
  • Importance of personal participation in native life
  • VIII. Recording of stereotyped manners of thinking and feeling
  • Corpus inscriptionum Kiriwinensium
  • IX. Summary of argument
  • native's vision of his world
  • I. Country and Inhabitants of the Kula District
  • I. Racial. divisions in Eastern New Guinea
  • Seligman's classification
  • Kula natives
  • II. Sub-divisions of the Kula district
  • III. Scenery at the Eastern end of New Guinea
  • Villages of the S. Massim; their customs and social institutions
  • IV. d'Entrecasteaux Archipelago
  • tribes of Dobu
  • mythological associations of their country
  • Some of their customs and institutions
  • Sorcery
  • vision on Sarubwoyna beach
  • V. Sailing North
  • Amphlett Group. Savage monopolists
  • II. Natives of the Trobriand Islands
  • I. Arrival in the coral Islands
  • First impression of the native
  • Some significant appearances and their deeper meaning
  • II. Position of women; their life and conduct before and after marriage
  • III. Further exploration in the villages
  • cross country walk
  • Gardens and gardening
  • IV. native's working power; their motives and incentives to work
  • Magic and work
  • digression on Primitive Economics
  • V. Chieftainship: power through" wealth; a plutocratic community
  • List of the various provinces and and political divisions in the Trobriands
  • VI. Totemism, the solidarity of clans and the bonds of kinship
  • VII. Spirits of the dead
  • overweening importance of magic
  • Black magic
  • prowling sorcerers and the flying witches
  • malevolent Visitors from the South, and epidemics
  • VIII. Eastern neighbours of of the Trobrianders
  • remaining districts of the Kula
  • III. Essentials of the Kula
  • I. concise definition of the Kula
  • II. Its economic character
  • III. articles exchanged; the conception of vaygu'a
  • IV. main rules and aspects of the Kula: the sociological aspect (partnership); direction of movement; nature of Kula ownership; the differential and integral effect of these rules
  • V. act of exchange; its regulations; the light it throws on the acquisitive and "communistic" tendencies of the natives; its concrete outlines; the sollicitory gifts
  • VI. associated activities and the secondary aspects of the Kula: construction of canoes; subsidiary trade---their true relation to the Kula; the ceremonial, mythology and magic associated with the Kula; the mortuary taboos and distributions, in their relation to the Kula
  • IV. Canoes and Sailing
  • I. value and importance of a canoe to a native
  • Its appearance, the impressions and emotions it arouses in those who use or own it
  • atmosphere of romance which surrounds it for the native
  • II. Analysis of its construction, in relation to its function
  • three types of canoes in the Trobriand Islands
  • III. V---Sociology of a large canoe (masawa)
  • III---(A). Social organisation of labour in constructing a canoe; the division of functions; the magical regulation of work
  • IV---(B). Sociology of canoe ownership; the toli-relationship; the toliwaga, "master" or "owner" of a canoe; the four privileges and functions of a toliwaga
  • V---(C). social division of functions in manning and sailing a canoe
  • Statistical data about the Trobriand shipping
  • V. Ceremonial Building of a Waga
  • I. Construction of canoes as part of the Kula proceedings. Magic and mythology
  • preparatory and the ceremonial stage of construction
  • II. first stage: expelling the wood sprite Tokway; transport of the log; the hollowing-out of the log and the associated magic
  • III. second stage: the inaugural rite of Kula magic; the native at grips with problems of construction; the wayugo creeper; the magical spell uttered over it; caulking; the three magical exorcisms
  • IV. Some general remarks about the two stages of canoe-building and the concomitant magic
  • Bulubwalata (evil magic) of canoes
  • ornamental prowboards
  • Dobuan and the Muruwan types of overseas canoe
  • VI. Launching of a Canoe and Ceremonial Visiting---Tribal Economics in the Trobriands
  • I. procedure and magic at launching
  • trial run (tasasoria)
  • Account of the launching and tasasoria seen on the beach of Kualukuba
  • Reflections on the decay of customs under European influence
  • II. Digression on the sociology of work: organisation of labour; forms of communial labour; payment for work
  • III. custom of ceremonial visiting (kabigidoya); local trade, done on such expeditions
  • IV---VII. Digression on gifts, payments, and exchanges
  • V. Attitude of the native towards wealth
  • Desire of display. Enhancement of social prestige through wealth
  • motives of accumulating food stuffs
  • vilamalya (magic of plenty), The handling of yams
  • Psychology of eating
  • Value of manufactured goods, psychologically analysed
  • V. Motives for exchange
  • Giving, as satisfaction of vanity and as display of power
  • Fallacy of the "economically isolated individual" or "household"
  • Absence of gain in exchange
  • VI. Exchange of gifts and barter
  • List of gifts, payments and commercial transactions
  • 1. Pure gifts
  • 2. Customary payments, repaid irregularly and without strict equivalents
  • 3. Payments for services rendered
  • 4. Gifts returned in strictly equivalent form
  • 5. Exchange of material goods against privileges, titles and non-material possessions
  • 6. Ceremonial barter with deferred payment
  • 7. Trade pure and simple
  • VI. Economic duties corresponding to various social ties; table of eight classes of social relationship, characterised by definite economic obligations
  • VII. Departure of an Overseas Expedition
  • Scene laid in Sinaketa
  • local chiefs
  • Stir in the village
  • social differentiation of the sailing party
  • Magical rites, associated with the preparing and loading of a canoe
  • sulumwoya rite
  • magical bundle (lilava)
  • compartments of a canoe and the gebobo spell
  • Farewells on the beach
  • VIII. First Halt of the Fleet on Muwa
  • I. definition of an uvalaku (ceremonial, competitive expedition)
  • II. sagaii (ceremonial distribution) on Muwa
  • III. magic of sailing
  • IX. Sailing on the Sea-arm of Pilolu
  • I. landscape
  • Mythological geography of the regions beyond
  • II. Sailing: the winds; navigation; technique of sailing a canoe and its dangers
  • III. customs and taboos of sailing
  • Privileged position of certain sub-clans
  • IV. beliefs in dreadful monsters lurking in the sea
  • X. Story of Shipwreck
  • I. flying witches, mulukwausi or yoyova: essentials of the belief; initiation and education of a yoyova (witch); secrecy surrounding this condition; manner of practising this witch-craft; actual cases
  • II. flying witches at sea and in ship-wreck
  • Other dangerous agents
  • kayga'u magic; its modes of operation
  • III. Account of the preparatory rites of kayga'u
  • Some incantations quoted
  • IV. story of ship-wreck and rescue
  • V. spell of the rescuing giant fish
  • myth and the magical formula of Tokulubwaydoga
  • XI. In the Amphletts---Sociology of the Kula
  • I. Arrival in Gumasila
  • Example of a Kula conversation
  • Trobrianders on long visits in the Amphletts
  • II. Sociology of the Kula
  • 1. Sociological limitations to participation in the Kula
  • 2. Relation of Partnership
  • 3. Entering the Kula relationship
  • 4. Participation of women in the Kula
  • III. Natives of the Amphletts: their industries and trade; pottery; importing the clay; technology of pot-making; commercial relations with the surrounding districts
  • IV. Drift of migrations and cultural influences in this province
  • XII. In Tewara and Sanaroa---Mythology of the Kula
  • I. Sailing under the lee of Koytabu
  • cannibals of the unexplored jungle
  • Trobriand traditions and legends about them
  • history and song of Gumagabu
  • II. Myths and reality: significance imparted to landscape by myth; line of distinction between the mythical and the actual occurrences; magical power and mythical atmosphere; the three strata of Trobriand myths
  • III---V. myths of the Kula
  • III. Survey of Kula mythology and its geographical distribution
  • story of Gere'u of Muyuwa (Woodlark Island)
  • two stories of Tokosikuna of Digumenu and Gumasila
  • IV. Kudayuri myth of the flying canoe
  • Commentary and analysis of this myth
  • Association between the canoe and the flying witches
  • Mythology and the Lukuba clan
  • V. myth of Kasabwaybwayreta and the necklace Gumakarakedakeda
  • Comparison of these stories
  • VI. Sociological analysis of the myths: influence of the Kula myths upon native outlook; myth and custom
  • VII. relation between myth and actuality restated
  • VIII. story, the natural monuments and the religious ceremonial of the mythical personalities Atu'a'ine, Aturamo'a and their sister Sinatemubadiye'i --
  • Contents note continued: Other rocks of similar traditional nature
  • XIII. On the Beach of Sarubwoyna
  • I. halt on the Beach
  • beauty magic Some incantations quoted. The spell of the ta'uya (conch shell)
  • II. magical onset on the Koya
  • Psychological analysis of this magic
  • III. Gwara (taboo) and the Ka'ubana'i spell
  • XIV. Kula in Dobu---Technicalities of the Exchange
  • I. Reception in Dobu
  • II. main transactions of the Kula and the subsidiary gifts and exchanges: some general reflections on the driving force of the Kula; regulations of the main transaction; vaga (opening gift) and yotile (return gift); the sollicitory gifts (pokala, kwaypolu, kaributu, korotomna); intermediary gifts (basi) and final clinching gift (kudu); the other articles sometimes exchanged in the main transaction of the Kula (doga, samakupa, beku); commercial honour and ethics of the [ect.]
  • III. Kula proceedings in Dobu: wooing the partner; kwoygapani magic; the subsidiary trade; roamings of the Boyowans in the Dobu district
  • XV. Journey Home---The Fishing and Working of the Kaloma Shell
  • I. Visits made on the return trip
  • Some articles acquired
  • II. spondylus shell fishing in Sanaroa lagoon and in home waters: its general character and magic; the Kaloma myth; consecutive account of the technicalities, ceremonial and magic of the diving for the shell
  • III. Technology, economics and sociology of the production of the discs and necklaces from the shell
  • IV. Tanarere, display of the haul
  • Arrival of the party home to Sinaketa
  • XVI. Return Visit of the Dobuans to Sinaketa
  • I. uvalaku (ceremonial expedition) from Dobu to Southern Boyowa: the preparations in Dobu and Sanaroa; preparations in Gumasila; the excitement, the spreading and convergence of news; arrival of the Dobuan fleet in Nabwageta
  • II. Preparations in Sinaketa for the reception of the visiting party
  • Dobuans arrive
  • scene at Kaykuyawa point
  • ceremonial reception
  • Speeches and gifts
  • three days' sojurn of the Dobuans in Sinaketa
  • Manner of living
  • Exchange of gifts and barter
  • III. Return home. Results shown at the tanarere
  • XVII. Magic and the Kula
  • I. subject matter of Boyowan magic
  • Its association, with all the vital activities and with the unaccountable aspects of reality
  • II---V. native conception of magic
  • II. methods of arriving at its knowledge
  • III. Native views about the original sources of magic
  • Its primeval character
  • Inadmissability to the native of spontaneous generation in magic
  • Magic a power of man and not a force of nature
  • Magic and myth and their super-normal atmosphere
  • IV. magical acts: spell and rite; relation between these two factors; spells uttered directly without a concomitant rite; spells accompanied by simple rite of impregnation; spells accompanied by a rite of transference; spells accompanied by offerings and invocations; summary of this survey
  • V. Place where magic is stored in the human anatomy
  • VI. Condition of the performer
  • Taboos and observances
  • Sociological position
  • Actual descent and magical filiation
  • VII. Definition of systematic magic
  • "systems" of canoe magic and Kula magic
  • VIII. Supernormal or supernatural character of magic; emotional reaction of the natives to certain forms of magic; the kariyala (magical portent); role of ancestral spirits; native terminology
  • IX. Ceremonial setting of magic
  • X. Institution of taboo, supported by magic
  • Kaytubutabu and kaytapaku
  • XI. Purchase of certain forms of magic
  • Payments for magical services
  • XII. Brief summary
  • XVIII. Power of Words in Magic---Some Linguistic Data
  • I. Study of linguistic data in magic to throw light on native ideas about the power of words
  • II. text of the wayugo spell with literal translation
  • III. Linguistic analysis of its u'ula (exordium)
  • IV. Vocal technique of reciting a spell
  • Analysis of the tapwana (main part) and dogina (final part)
  • V. text of the Sulumwoya spell and its analysis
  • VI---XII. Linguistic data referring to the other spells mentioned in this volume and some general inferences
  • VI. tokway spell and the opening phrases of the canoe spells
  • VII. tapwana (main parts) of the canoe spells
  • VIII. end parts (dogina) of these spells
  • IX. u'ula of the mwasila spells
  • X. tapwana and the dogina of these spells
  • XI. kayga'u spells
  • XII. Summary of the results of this linguistic survey
  • XIII. Substances used in these magical rites
  • XIV---XVIII. Analysis of some non-magical linguistic texts, to illustrate ethnographic method and native way of thinking
  • XIV. General remarks about certain aspects of method
  • XV. Text No. 1, its literal and free translation
  • XVI. Commentary
  • XVII. Texts No. 2 and 3 translated and commented upon
  • XIX. Inland Kula
  • I. To'uluwa, the chief of Kiriwina, on a visit in Sinaketa
  • decay of his power
  • Some melancholy reflections about the folly of destroying the native order of things and of undermining native authority as now prevailing
  • II. division into "Kula communities; "the three types of Kula, with respect to this division
  • overseas Kula
  • III. inland Kula between two "Kula communities" and within such a unit
  • IV. "Kula- communities" in Boyowa (Trobriand Islands)
  • XX. Expeditions Between Kiriwina and Kitava
  • I, II Account of an expedition from Kiriwina to Kitava
  • I. Fixing dates and preparing districts
  • II. Preliminaries of the journey
  • Departure from Kaulukuba Beach
  • Sailing. Analogies and differences between these expeditions and those of the Sinaketans, to Dobu
  • Entering the village
  • youlawada custom
  • Sojourn in Kitava and return
  • III. So'i (mortuary feast) in the Eastern district (Kitava to Muyuwa) and its association with the Kula
  • XXI. Remaining Branches and Offshoots of The Kula
  • I. Rapid survey of the routes between Woodlark Island (Murua or Muyuwa) and the Engineer group and between this latter and Dobu
  • II. ordinary trade carried on between these communities
  • III. offshoot of the Kula; trading expeditions between the Western Trobriand (Kavataria and Kayleula) and the Western d'Entrecasteaux
  • IV. Production of mwali (armshells)
  • V. Some other offshoots and leakages of the Kula ring
  • Entry of the Kula vaygu'a into the Ring
  • XXII. Meaning of the Kula.
Other information
  • "Now with 80 digitally enhanced historic photos and maps"--Cover.
  • Reprint. Originally published 1922.
  • Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN
  • 9781478602095
  • 1478602090
Identifying numbers
  • OCLC: 867799723
  • OCLC: 867799723